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Everything listed under: Legislation

  • The Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Isn’t a Game. Or Is It?

     

    U.S. Congress has been trying to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) all year, but it still hasn’t passed. It turns out that the ESEA isn’t the only bill to get hung up in federal congressional debate; only 1% of bills that go through U.S. Congress pass.

    Learn More About ESEA: What Our Nation’s No Child Left Behind Policy Is

    The Reauthorization of the ESEA shouldn’t be a political game, but it sometimes seems as though Congress treats it like one. To draw attention to the ESEA, and to help advocate for its reauthorization, EducationWeek.com published an online game called, “Can You Beat The Legislative Odds and Get Your Bill Passed?”

    The game uses multiple choice questions to guide you through a sort of “choose your own adventure” storyline. The goal: to have your bill passed by Congress and signed off on by the President. The catch: you have to be politically savvy to push the bill from a big idea to a real-life law. You can try your hand at the political gamut here

    .

    According to Education Week and the Sunlight Foundation, members of Congress introduced 5,584 bills in 2013, and only 15 Senate bills and 41 House bills were passed into law.

    Read more about the federal legislative process, and about why education bills can take so long to make their way through Congress and to the President’s desk in this story on the Education Week Blog.

    Learn more about education policy and legislation by bookmarking Missouri Parent News. You can also connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

     

  • Missouri Education Advocates: The Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education (MO-CASE)

    Name: The Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education (MO-CASE)

    About: MO-CASE is a subdivision of the Council of Administrators of Special Education (CASE), a division of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC). MO-CASE is dedicated to the professional development and support of administrators and supervisors of special education within Missouri’s educational settings.

    MO-CASE provides support and resources to all special education directors in Missouri. MO-CASE achieves its goals through a newsletter, conferences, and scholarships. (Source)

    Purpose: The purpose of MO-CASE is:

    · To promote professional leadership among special educators
    · To promoted the study of issues common to its members
    · To communicate, through discussion and publications, information that will assist in the development of improved services for exceptional children in the state
    · To participate actively in the improvement and the expansion of special education programs in the state (Source)

    Tweet with us using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.

    President: Steven Beldin

    Website: http://www.MO-Case.org/

    Social Media Sites: https://www.Facebook.com/MissouriCase

    Legislation & Advocacy: You can read details about MO-CASE’s legislative platform and advocacy perspectives on its website. Here’s a brief summary of each of the organization’s key policy perspectives:

    · MO-CASE opposes school transfer and open enrollment
    · MO-CASE opposes school vouchers
    · MO-CASE supports increased charter school accountability
    · MO-CASE opposes legislation that would mandate student retention
    · MO-CASE generally opposes legislation that singles out discreet disabilities for different treatment within the education system
    · MO-CASE supports legislation that promotes understanding of specific disabilities and provides quality recommendations for improving services to children with those disabilities
    · MO-CASE is concerned about federal and state legislative and policy proposals that would revise teacher evaluation systems, teacher tenure, and establish differentiated compensation (pay for performance)
    · MO-CASE believes that teacher evaluation, tenure and compensation may be based in part on student growth, but not as a majority portion so that other factors become inconsequential.
    · MO-CASE is against corporal punishment in schools
    · MO-CASE supports state policy initiatives that move Missouri toward universally accessible preschool for all children
    · MO-CASE strongly supports mandatory early childhood special education services (ECSE)
    · MO-CASE supports federal legislation that reasonably limits the use of seclusion, restraint and aversive interventions.
    · MO-CASE strongly supports increasing federal and state funding to adequately support the significant special education requirements imposed on schools.

    This post is part of a running series called “Missouri Education Advocates,” which is designed to highlight the professional education organizations in Missouri that work on public education legislation and advocacy. These short and sweet features highlight basic information about some of Missouri’s leading education organizations.

    Connect with Missouri Parent on Facebook and Twitter and share our Missouri Education Advocates posts with your network using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.



  • Missouri Education Advocates: The Missouri Council of School Administrators (MCSA)

     

     

    Name: The Missouri Council of School Administrators (MCSA)

    About: MCSA is a 501(c)3 nonprofit umbrella organization for two autonomous statewide professional associations of public school administrators. Those associations are the Missouri Association of School Administrators (MASA)*, which serves school superintendents, and the Missouri Association of Elementary School Principals (MAESP), which serves elementary and middle school principals. (Source)

    MCSA exists for the sole purpose of providing quality professional development opportunities for school administrators, central office administrators, secondary and elementary administrators, and professional/non professional staff. (Source)

    Learn More: #MoEdAdvocates posts on MASA and MAESP

    Tweet with us using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.

    Number of Employees: Many of MCSA’s ten employees work for MASA, MAESP, or MOASBO, as well as for MCSA. You can see a complete staff list, including the roles of each employee in MASA, MCSA, MAESP, and MOASBO here.

    Director: Lonnie Schneider
    (Schneider is also the Association Executive Director of MASA.)

    Websites:
    http://www.MCSA.org/
    http://www.MCSAOutreach.org/

    This post is part of a running series called “Missouri Education Advocates,” which is designed to highlight the professional education organizations in Missouri that work on public education legislation and advocacy. These short and sweet features highlight basic information about some of Missouri’s leading education organizations.

    Connect with Missouri Parent on Facebook and Twitter and share our Missouri Education Advocates posts with your network using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.

    *The Missouri Parent program is sponsored by MASA and is its primary advocacy arm.




  • Missouri Education Advocates: The Missouri Association of Secondary School Principals (MASSP)

     

    Name: The Missouri Association of Secondary School Principals (MASSP)

    About: MASSP is a professional organization committed to the ongoing improvement of secondary education, the professional development of middle level and high school principals and assistant principals, and programs for the youth of Missouri.

    It is the only association in Missouri that serves the professional needs of middle school and high school principals and assistant principals with programs designed by secondary school administrators for secondary school administrators. (Source)

    Tweet with us using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.

    Mission: To improve secondary education through positive leadership and the enhancement of student performance. (Source)

    Read more about MASSP’s mission and beliefs here.

    Number of Employees: 2

    Executive Director: Phil Lewis

    Website: http://www.MOASSP.org/

    Social Media Sites:
    MASSP on Twitter
    MASSP on Facebook

    Legislation & Advocacy:
    MASSP’s advocacy efforts are woven into the efforts of the School Administrators Coalition (SAC) and Better Schools for Missouri. SAC sends out weekly email newsletter during legislative sessions, and the national association has a presence on Capitol Hill. Better Schools for Missouri helps supports of public education to elect Missouri lawmakers who share their value of quality public education.

    Read More: #MOEdAdvocates: Better Schools for Missouri

    This post is part of a running series called “Missouri Education Advocates,” which is designed to highlight the professional education organizations in Missouri that work on public education legislation and advocacy. These short and sweet features highlight basic information about some of Missouri’s leading education organizations.

    Connect with Missouri Parent on Facebook and Twitter and share our Missouri Education Advocates posts with your network using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates



  • Missouri Education Advocates: The Missouri Association of School Business Officials (MoASBO)

     

    Name: The Missouri Association of School Business Officials (MoASBO)

    About: MoASBO is the premier association of Missouri for those managing district resources, supporting its members in managing school district resources by providing professional growth and networking opportunities.

    MoASBO aims to:
    · promulgate and establish high standards of ethics and efficiency in business methods and practices as related to the administration and operation of the public schools in the State of Missouri.
    · study, analyze and disseminate the most efficient methods and practices in all matters pertaining to school business administration; and
    · make comprehensive and progressive study of the school business profession and to recommend standards of practice for the school business official.

    Tweet with us using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.

    President: Ron Orr


    Website: http://www.MoASBO.org/

    Legislation & Advocacy: MoASBO is a sustaining member of Better Schools for Missouri.

    This post is part of a running series called “Missouri Education Advocates,” which is designed to highlight the professional education organizations in Missouri that work on public education legislation and advocacy. These short and sweet features highlight basic information about some of Missouri’s leading education organizations.

    Connect with Missouri Parent on Facebook and Twitter and share our Missouri Education Advocates posts with your network using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates



  • Missouri Education Advocates: The Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL)

      

    Name: The Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL)

    About: MASL is the premier professional organization for library media specialists who work in Missouri schools.

    The purpose of MASL is:

    · To advocate for access to school library media center services and resources for Missouri’s children.
    · To develop collaborative relationships with stakeholders in the educational community
    · To enable the use of information technologies in Missouri schools.
    · To provide opportunities for continuing professional education, focusing on exemplary practices in school library media centers.
    · To recognize significant contributions to the profession and to the improvement of school library media programs in Missouri.

    Tweet with us using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates.

    Readers Awards: MASL presents four Readers Awards each year, representing the best current youth literature available to students of different grade levels. MASL creates a preliminary list of titles, and students across the state can vote on which books win a MASL Readers Award. See the 2015-16 Readers Awards Nominees.

    MASL’s Readers Awards are:
    · Show Me Readers Award (grades 1-3)
    · Mark Twain Readers Award (grades 4-6)
    · Truman Readers Award (grades 6-8)
    · Gateway Readers Award (grades 9-12)

    Number of Employees: MASL’s board sets direction and policies for the organization, but a third-party management company runs MASL’s communications, finances, member services, readers award programs, and events, and manages its general office duties.

    President of the Board: Lysha Thompson
    A full list of MASL’s Board of Directors is available on its website.


    Website:
    http://www.MASLOnline.org/

    Social Media: MASL on Facebook

    Legislation & Advocacy: MASL advocates for intellectual freedom. More information about MASL’s legislative advocacy, including its legislative agenda, is available to members. You can learn more about the American Association of School Librarian’s advocacy efforts here.

    This post is part of a running series called “Missouri Education Advocates,” which is designed to highlight the professional education organizations in Missouri that work on public education legislation and advocacy. These short and sweet features highlight basic information about some of Missouri’s leading education organizations.

    Connect with Missouri Parent on Facebook and Twitter and share our Missouri Education Advocates posts with your network using the hashtag #MoEdAdvocates




  • Missouri Legislature Begins Filing Education Bills

    The filing period for the 98th Missouri General Assembly opened on December 1, 2014 and concluded on January 6, 2015. Several veteran and new legislators have filed education-related bills which could impact all Missourians. While filing a bill does not guarantee any of these ideas will become law in Missouri, we will continue to monitor and report on these bills as they move through the legislative process. 

    The embedded tweets below contain links to the actual bill information on the web pages of the Missouri House of Representatives and Missouri Senate. For more information on the bills, feel free to contact Missouri Parent or the sponsor of the legislation.

    *Updated with more pre-filed education-related bills, 1.6.2015

  • Missouri Schools Should Be Prioritized Above Tax Cuts

     

     

    Governor Jay Nixon vetoed 33 bills during the 2014 legislative session. Ten of those bills, which his administration calls “#FridayFavors”, were vetoes of tax break bills that could reduce state and local tax revenues by more than $776 million annually, $425 million of that at the state level.



    These tax breaks are good for corporations and bad for schools. TWEET THIS

    Businesses would save $425 million in tax deals, while schools, which rely heavily upon Missouri General Revenue, would see a reduction of around $119 million in funding. Urban and rural schools, which traditionally see lower levels of local funding, would be among the hardest hit by the Friday Favors. TWEET THIS

    The Kansas City Star calls the tax breaks unwise, explaining their risk to schools:

    “It would be unwise to slash into revenues so deeply that it threatened funding for public schools, universities and services for six million residents.”

    The Star is not alone in its concern about tax breaks that would reduce state-level funding for education. Missouri Budget Director Linda Luebbering told KOMU News:

    “This is very significant from the standpoint that you have to reduce services and programs in order to make up for that loss. The biggest single beneficiary of state general revenue is K-12 education.”

    Legislators will reconvene on September 10th in veto session for a chance to override Gov. Nixon’s vetoes. If you’re concerned about funding for Missouri’s schools, reach out to your representative immediately. Let him or her know that your child’s education should be a higher priority than saving a fast food chain or other large corporation a few dollars in state taxes.

     

     

    photo credit: nicolasnova via photopin cc

  • Projected Impact of the SB 509 Tax Cut on Individual School Districts in Missouri

    Click the image above to learn the projected impact of the SB 509 tax cut on every individual public school district in Missouri.

    Use this link to look up your local legislator and ask them to sustain Governor Nixon's veto

    Contact the legislators who have been strong supporters of public schools and who have voted against previous tax cuts due to their impact on education.

    Sen. David Pearce: david.pearce@senate.mo.gov
    2. Rep. Elaine Gannon: elaine.gannon@house.mo.gov
    3. Rep. Paul Fitzwater: paul.fitzwater@house.mo.gov
    4. Rep. Sue Entlicher: sue.entlicher@house.mo.gov
    5. Rep. Mike Thomson: mike.thomson@house.mo.gov
    6. Rep. Lyle Rowland: lyle.rowland@house.mo.gov
    7. Rep. Craig Redmon: craig.redmon@house.mo.gov
    8. Rep. Don Phillips: don.phillips@house.mo.gov
    9. Rep. Donna Pfautsch: donna.pfautsch@house.mo.gov
    10. Rep. Lynn Morris: lynn.morris@house.mo.gov
    11. Rep. Jeff Messenger: jeff.messenger@house.mo.gov
    12. Rep. Kent Hampton: kent.hampton@house.mo.gov
    13. Rep. Lyndall Fraker: lyndall.fraker@house.mo.gov


  • Missouri Interim Committee on Education Hearing Results


    In October 2013, the Missouri House of Representatives Interim Committee on Education toured Missouri in a series of public education hearings.

    Representatives talked with communities across the state about issues surrounding Missouri K-12 public education, and on December 2, 2013, the Committee published a report summarizing the process, locations & dates, and findings from the statewide hearings.

    As the Missouri Legislature reconvenes this week, we provide a brief overview of its findings and recommendations:

    School Transfers
    The Committee recommends, at a minimum, limiting tuition to a single amount. In addition, the Committee recommends statutory changes that would prescribe scope of control over acceptable numbers of and conditions for student transfers

    Early Childhood Education
    “The most enthusiastically recommended and most often mentioned possibility for long term improvement of academic achievement was early childhood education.”

    “...the budget and appropriations committees will need to determine the scope of any possible increase [in funding] and decide if existing methods of fund delivery are sufficient.”

    School Calendar and Extended Learning
    An overall increase in learning time for every student, especially for struggling students and districts is recommended by the Committee.

    Career and Technical Education (CTE)
    “Career and technical education is the state’s best channel for providing the foundation for a good job that might not require a bachelor’s degree.”

    The Committee hopes that changes to the CTE governance and communication structures (in SB 9 (2013)) will remedy parent and teacher concerns that MSIP standards don’t recognize the value of CTE programs.

    Wraparound Services
    “Services to address problems such as hunger, bad vision, and medical conditions that hinder academic achievement can make an enormous difference in a student’s life…To be most effective, they must be fine-tuned to each district’s circumstances.”

    Parent-Community-School Relationships and Transparency
    “Good schools reach out to the community and parents…Schools that meet parents more than halfway usually get better results.”

    Virtual Learning
    The state’s job in virtual learning, “is to safeguard the quality of the instruction and curriculum while providing access to more students for more subjects.”

    Educator Preparation
    “The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has raised the bar for teacher education and principal/administrator development programs requiring more rigorous standards…Changing teacher preparation standards goes hand-in-hand with changing student standards and assessments, and evaluations.”

    Educator Evaluation
    Teachers voiced a desire to see evaluations consistently and fairly administered. “More walk-throughs with quick feedback work better than observing a teacher once for an hour…Developing the capacity of principals and others to provide useful feedback is a priority.”

    Tenure
    “Ideally, effective teachers are coached into being more effective or coached out of the profession…Tenure has historically been linked with getting into the profession; however, the standards for staying in the profession and for continuous improvement of performance are a newer development.”

    Common Core Standards and Assessments
    “The most heated testimony heard by the committee concerned the Common Core State Standards initiative. It was apparent that a disconnect has occurred in two areas — the first, between some districts and some of their patrons, and the second, between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the average Missouri parent.”

    “The Committee remains concerned over the issue and will be watchful to protect the openness of all processes related to it, especially the statutory protection for curriculum as a local decision (160.514, subsection 3).”

    School Safety
    “The Committee did not receive much testimony on school safety, despite a number of recent incidents of school violence in other states. The Committee’s hope is that the lack of testimony results from most parents believing their children are safe in the state’s schools.”

    You can download and save a PDF of the Committee’s full report by clicking here.

    Missouri Parent will be discussing all of these issues in greater depth, from our perspective, and through out the legislative session this year. For more about the Interim Committee on Education’s October 2013 education hearings, read these posts from the Missouri Parent Blog:

    The Missouri House Interim Committee on Education October Hearings
    Highlights of Recent Missouri Education Hearings
    These Legislators Stood Strong for Public Education in Missouri

  • These Legislators Stood Strong for Education in Missouri

    During the last session of the Missouri Legislature, legislators sponsored and sent a bill to Governor Nixon that would harm state funding for public education.

    Billed as an economic development initiative, the main plank of the legislation was to provide an income tax cut to Missourians of nearly $800 million. This tax cut would have largely come at the expense of funding our state’s public schools which have not received full funding for the past six years under the school foundation formula lawmakers wrote and passed.

    This year alone, those promised funds fell short to the tune of $600 million.

    Governor Nixon vetoed the legislation and the House of Representatives failed to override his veto during the Legislature’s veto session in September. Proponents of the ideas, both elected and from the general public, have vowed to bring the issue back again for the next legislative session beginning in January of 2014.

    The veto was sustained through the political courage of many state representatives of both parties. Several Republicans bravely rebuffed the efforts of House leadership and wealthy donors and stood with our public school students and their school districts.

    While the Missouri Parent program is a fiscally conservative effort and supports many of the economic development practices of our state, we cannot let certain billionaires and politicians put their aspirations in front of the education of Missouri’s K-12 students.

    Today we begin saluting the dozens of legislators who stood with our students. Specifically we would like to honor seventeen state representatives who did the right thing in September. We ask them to maintain their decision in the future and continue to work with Missouri Parent and public education supporters like you from across the Show-Me State as we seek to balance the funding needs of the future, the economic development needs of today, and to replace the appropriation shortages for education of that linger.

    The seventeen who especially #StoodStrong for education are as follows:

    Rep. Steve Hodges, D-East Prarie
    Rep. Jeff Roorda, D-Barnhart
    Rep. Ed Scheiffer, D-Troy
    Rep. Nate Walker, R-Kirksville
    Rep. Craig Redmon, R-Monticello
    Rep. Sue Entlicher, R-Bolivar
    Rep. Paul Fitzwater, R-Potosi
    Rep. Mike Thomson, R-Maryville
    Rep. Lyle Rowland, R-Cedarcreek
    Rep. Lyndall Fraker, R-Marshfield
    Rep. Lynn Morris, R-Nixa
    Rep. Jeffrey Messenger, R-Republic
    Rep. Kent Hampton, R-Malden
    Rep. Donna Pfautch, R-Harrisonville
    Rep. Elaine Gannon, R-DeSoto
    Rep. David Wood, R-Versailles
    Rep. Dennis Fowler, R-Advance

    We ask all involved with and supportive of the Missouri Parent program to take a moment to send a note or phone call of thanks to these representatives. Their official websites are linked above. You can also share this article or any of the member links with the #StoodStrong hashtag on Social Media to help broaden support.

    The days ahead, especially in the next legislative session, will not be easy for these members or public education funding. The importance of all Missourians getting involved in grassroots organizations like Missouri Parent may have never been greater than now.

    To get involved, use the links at the top of this page, Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter as we frequently share ways for you to make an impact on education policy along with our informative articles about education and learning in our schools.

    Your support is greatly appreciated.




  • The Missouri House Interim Committee on Education Public Hearing Schedule+

    The Missouri House Interim Committee on Education is taking a month-long tour across the state to hear from you — the Missouri public — on K-12 education in the state of Missouri.

    Missouri Parent encourages you to take an active role in your child’s public education by learning more about the hot-topic educational issues facing Missouri’s kids, and by sharing your ideas with the Missouri House Interim Committee on Education at one of the following hearings:

    Note: Not all Committee hearing details are published at this time. As Missouri Parent learns more details, we’ll share them on our Facebook Page.

    Education Hearing Times & Locations

    Monday, September 23 - Cottleville
    Time: 2:00 pm
    St. Charles Community College
    Social Sciences Building Auditorium
    4601 Mid Rivers Mall Drive
    Cottleville, MO
    Monday, September 23 – Kirkwood

    Time: 7:00 pm
    St. Louis Community College at Meramec Campus
    Student Center Meeting Rooms SC200/SC201
    11333 Big Bend Road
    Kirkwood, MO
    Tuesday, September 24

    - Cape Girardeau
    Time: 2:00 pm
    Southeast Missouri State University
    Shuck Music Recital Hall
    River Campus
    1 University Plaza
    Cape Girardeau, MO

    Tuesday, September 24- Poplar Bluff

    Time: 7:00 pm

    Three Rivers Community College
    Tinnin Fine Arts Center School
    2080 Three Rivers Blvd.
    Poplar Bluff, MO
    Wednesday, September 25
    - Point Lookout
    Time: 1:00 pm
    College of the Ozarks
    Keeter Center
    One Opportunity Avenue
    Point Lookout. MO
    Wednesday, September 25- Joplin

    Time: 7:00 pm
    Missouri Southern State University
    Corley Auditorium
    3950 Newman Road
    Joplin, MO
    Monday, October 21- Hannibal

    Time: 3:30 pm
    Hannibal-LaGrange College
    Hannibal, MO
    (Specific location TBD)

    Tuesday, October 22 - Maryville
    Time: 1:00 pm
    Northwest Missouri State University
    Maryville, MO
    (Specific location TBD)

    Tuesday, October 22 - Kansas City
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Kansas City, MO
    (Specific location TBD)

    Wednesday, October 23 - Warrensburg
    Time: 1:00 pm
    University of Central Missouri
    Warrensburg, MO
    (Specific location TBD)

    To receive legislative updates directly in your inbox, subscribe today to Missouri Parent emails by submitting your email address and zip code at the top of this page.


  • Missouri Educators Speak Out Against HB 253

    Dr. Lori Van Leer, Superintendent of Washington (MO) Public Schools (source: LinkedIn)

    Across the state, Missouri’s educators are speaking out against House Bill No. 253, which could wreak havoc on public education budgets. A survey of news sources across the state reveals superintendents statewide are going on the record against HB 253.

    Here’s what some of those superintendents have to say:

    “There has been no Board action, but we support the Governor’s stance on this issue. If it’s [HB 253] passed, it [HB 253] would have a dramatic financial impact on public education and could be absolutely devastating for some districts. We are hopeful the veto stands.”
    - Dr. Jerrod Wheeler, West Platte Superintendent in the The Platte County Citizen (8/1/13)

    “This is not a time in our state’s history to be experimenting with policies that could significantly damage, if not completely devastate, schools and others that would be impacted by the potential this would not work.”
    -C.J. Huff, Joplin Superintendent in the Joplin Globe (7/28/13)

    “In addition to underfunding the entire education system of the state, Missouri provides zero dollars for professional development for educators in our struggling school districts and classroom technology needs are either being met by local tax payers or going completely unanswered.”
    -Paul Ziegler, Northwest R-1 School District Superintendent and President of the Missouri Association of School Administrators (7/21/13)

    “I fail to see how we can advance this country and advance our school systems that are charged with educating youth with dwindling resources. Education is fundamental to our success locally, as a state and as a nation. Missouri wants to be more, yet it grossly underfunds the one thing that can drive our economic engine.”
    - Dr. Lori VanLeer, Washington Superintendent in emissourian.com (7/25/13)

    “Unfortunately, House Bill 253 could put all of our past success and future opportunities at risk by taking money away from our schools and by making it more expensive to improve our facilities for students. That’s why we are continuing to talk to our elected representatives about the need to support our schools and protect taxpayers by sustaining the Governor’s veto of House Bill 253.”
    -Norm Ridder, Springfield Public Schools’ Superintendent in The Ozarks Sentinel (8/8/13)

    House Bill No. 253 is not in the best interest of Missouri’s students or the schools they attend. 

    To learn more about HB 253 and how educators across the state are responding to the General Assembly’s opportunity to override Governor Nixon’s veto of the bill, sign up for MO Parent email updates today.


  • Independent Credit Agencies Say HB 253 Bad Idea

    Three leading independent credit rating agencies — Standard & Poor’s, Fitch, and Moody’s — show that House Bill 253 poses serious risk to Missouri’s financial health and long-standing AAA credit rating.

    Missouri House Bill 253 was vetoed in June by Governor Jay Nixon, who called the bill “an ill-conceive, financially irresponsible experiment that would inject far-reaching uncertainty into our economy, undermine our state’s fiscal health, and jeopardize basic funding for education and vital public services.”

    Governor Nixon’s veto could be overturned when the General Assembly meets on September 11th for its annual veto session. It will take 109 votes in the Missouri House to overturn the Governor’s veto, at which time the bill would move to the Missouri State Senate. In the Senate, 23 votes are needed to officially overturn Governor Nixon’s veto, placing Missouri public education in danger.

    “We believe that if the Missouri legislature overrides the governor’s veto [of HB 253] and enacts the legislation, and the federal government passes the Marketplace Fairness Act, it has the potential to result in a significant financial impact to the state, despite requirements for the maintenance of a balanced budget.”
    Standard & Poor’s in its July 24th Report on HB 253

    In its August 8th coverage of the House Bill 253 veto, The Ozarks Sentinel said:

    “The negative impact of House Bill 253 on schools in the Springfield area would be significant. When fully implemented, the cost each year could be $4.3 million for Springfield schools; $800,000 for Branson schools; and $2 million for Nixa schools. If the Federal Marketplace Fairness Act becomes law, the cost for the current year could be $7.5 million for Springfield schools; $1.3 million for Branson schools; and $3.5 million for Nixa schools.”

    To learn what the impact of House Bill 253 would be on your school district, check the Foundation Formula Scenario published by the state.

    Do you want to remain informed on Missouri House Bill 253 and other state and local policies that affect your child’s education in the state of Missouri? Subscribe today to MO Parent email updates.

  • What Missouri Educators Are Doing to Fight HB 253

    Read the bill and veto message for yourself by clicking the image above.

    In June 2013, Governor Jay Nixon vetoed Missouri House Bill 253, calling it “an ill-conceived, fiscally irresponsible experiment,” in part because of the damage it could to do state-funded services including public education.

    “House Bill 253 is a reckless fiscal experiment cooked up by a few special interests that could knock Missouri permanently off course and send us heading in the wrong direction.”

    Missouri teachers and administrators agree with Governor Nixon, arguing that the state’s public education system is already underfunded, and that HB 253 will only compound existing funding issues.

    According to the Missouri Association of School Administrators, “Missouri’s statutorily required formula for school funding is underfunded by over $600 million his year”. The additional financial effects of HB253 would be devastating to individual school district’s budgets.”

    School districts across the state are raising awareness and contacting their legislators.

    One example is in Springfield, Missouri, where the Springfield Board of Education recently passed a resolution urging the Missouri General Assembly to sustain the Governor’s veto of House Bill No. 253:

    “Today, Missouri’s GDP is up, unemployment is down and our perfect credit rating is intact. However, House Bill 253 puts all of this progress in jeopardy by funneling millions of dollars away from our public schools – and into the pockets of lawyers and lobbyists – each and every year. House Bill 253 is a reckless fiscal experiment cooked up by a few special interests that could knock Missouri permanently off course and send us heading in the wrong direction.”

    On September 11, the Missouri General Assembly will vote to sustain or override Governor Nixon’s veto of House Bill No. 253. 109 votes would be necessary for a House override, at which time the bill would move into the Missouri Senate. 23 senators would need to vote in favor of overriding the Governor’s veto.

    If Governor Nixon’s veto is overruled, Missouri’s schools will suffer. To find out how HB 253 would affect your local school district, click here.

    To stay up-to-date on this and other policies issues that could affect your child’s access to a free, quality public education, sign up today for MO Parent email updates.


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